Understanding Premises Liability

Usually arising in personal injury claims, premises liability governs cases where the injury resulted from an unsafe or defective condition on someone’s property. In order for a personal injury lawyer to prevail in a premises liability claim, he or she must show that the property owner was negligent in owning or maintaining the property. This means the injured party must be able to prove that the property owner knew or had reason to know that the property was in an unsafe condition and didn’t take the proper steps to fix the situation or to warn of the danger.

slip and fall accidents Gaithersburg

Slip and fall
Slip and fall accidents are some of the most common personal injury claims involving premises liability. They are also some of the most straightforward, as they involve situations where the injured party slipped or tripped on another’s property. Common conditions that can lead to slip and fall accidents include defective staircases, accumulation of ice or snow, wet floors, unsecured carpeting or spills. Injury victims can also bring premises liability claims when the accident involved loose or broken floors, sidewalks, or steps.

Inadequate building security
Offices building owners and apartment owners have a duty to reasonably secure building access for employees and tenants. This duty is the reason why many apartment buildings have doormen and why many office buildings have security guards. Small apartment buildings may satisfy this duty with rules requiring tenants to keep the front and back doors locked. If an owner fails to provide adequate security and an injury results, the victim should consult with a personal injury lawyer serving Gaithersburg. If the lawyer is able to show that the building owner didn’t take reasonable steps to secure the building, then he or she may prevail in a premises liability claim, even where the injury was caused by a criminal who had entered onto the property.

Swimming pool accidents
Cases of swimming pool accidents usually involve children and unsupervised or unsecured pooling areas. Most states require swimming pools to be fenced with a locked gate. If someone using the pool fails to lock that gate, or the locking gate has fallen into disrepair, then he or she can be held responsible for subsequent personal injuries in a premises liability case.

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